Discuss Theology

Categories

Meta

Justification, Christianity Today and the “new” Perspective

August 11th, 2007

The times have not really changed that much since Luther’s day.  It is refreshing to see that the editors of Christianity Today still get it about the central importance of justification for christianity.

1 Comment »

  1. jonas says

    I found the CT article good in many ways. And I agree with the author that NP adherents often seem to reduce “works of the law” to national identity markers (sabbath, circumcision and kosher) in a wrong way. Surely, works of the law and “establishing a righteousness of their own” includes the tendency to try to earn merit before God through good and upright behaviour. And it is extremely important that we understand this. However, the author’s view of OT righteousness is problematic. This is what he says:

    “In the Old Testament, “righteousness” is the status that an Israelite received when he or she fully observed the requirements of the law: “And if we are careful to obey all this law before the Lord our God, as he has commanded us, that will be our righteousness” (Deut. 6:25). The tragedy of the covenant, however, is that despite God’s glorious provision of redemption and of his Torah, the Israelites often behaved just like Gentiles. Stiff-necked and hard-hearted, they rebelled against God. They never attained the status of righteousness, which they would have possessed had they lived up to the ideal in Deuteronomy.”

    So, the author believes that the way to become righteus before God in Old Testament times was not through faith but perfect obedience to the letter of the law? It is clear to me that the cluster of questions around the law, works, faith, obedience and righteousness can not be adequately answered with that kind of misunderstanding lurking in the background.

    Any comment on this issue?

    Blessings on ya all!

    Jonas

    August 11th, 2007 | #

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Sky3c sponsored by Aviva Web Directory